Remineralize the Earth

Joanna Campe’s Testimonial

Abadiania, Brazil

For the last four years I have been spending a few months every year at a healing center in Brazil during the winter and rent a house with a lovely garden. Last year a friend, Walter Schroth, who has an inn called Pousada Caminho Encantado very close by, became an avid remineralizer and has remineralized hundreds of trees.

This trip he offered me some rock dust that he gets from the local quarry, a quite finely ground bluish basaltwhich looks very similar to the basalt available in Kauai, which is referred to as bluestone.

He also loaned me his gardener who wheeled it over in a wheelbarrow. The first picture taken on November 10th soon after I arrived shows a bougainvillea near the end of its blossoming time. All the times that I have stayed here the tree has grown very little. The rock dust was applied on December 21. The plants have a gravel mulch and the rock dust was applied on top leaving it to the rain to take it through the gravel into the soil. The next photos were taken on February 9th, only six weeks later! I have never seen such dense flower before. I emailed the photos to the owner of the house who was quite awed. The tree is bending over to such a degree that we will have to put new supports to hold up it up. Many of the other plants have tremendous new growth and some that were chlorotic are a verdant green. There is a palm and a ginger plant which still have yellowing leaves and I will keep my eyes on them and get back to you as an update if that changes.

Peggy Day’s Testimonial

Mystic, Connecticut
My husband John and I couldn’t be happier with our brand-new garden  this year! It’s not very big, but it supplies all the produce that we  can possibly use. The vegetables are amazing and we give away basketfuls  each week.
This spring when we were just starting to dig up the soil, Dan Kittredge  and Roshni Prabakar told us about using various rock dusts and humate.  We are absolutely delighted with our incredibly big and tasty 17”  cucumbers (10 to 12 of them each week, 3 inches in diameter), 2 1/2-inch  diameter “cherry” tomatoes (no one told them they were supposed to be  small! lol ), 2 1/2-inch diameter carrots, and 5” diameter broccoli  florettes. And no diseases or infestations the entire season - at least  none that we know of! It’s been quite a summer, and we are so very  grateful to know about remineralizing!

Peggy Day’s Testimonial

Mystic, Connecticut

My husband John and I couldn’t be happier with our brand-new garden this year! It’s not very big, but it supplies all the produce that we can possibly use. The vegetables are amazing and we give away basketfuls each week.

This spring when we were just starting to dig up the soil, Dan Kittredge and Roshni Prabakar told us about using various rock dusts and humate. We are absolutely delighted with our incredibly big and tasty 17” cucumbers (10 to 12 of them each week, 3 inches in diameter), 2 1/2-inch diameter “cherry” tomatoes (no one told them they were supposed to be small! lol ), 2 1/2-inch diameter carrots, and 5” diameter broccoli florettes. And no diseases or infestations the entire season - at least none that we know of! It’s been quite a summer, and we are so very grateful to know about remineralizing!

Sammy De’s Testimonial

Barre, Massachusetts

After speaking with Remineralize the Earth’s own Joanna Campe, Sammy decided to add Azomite to the soil in her garden. She kept a diary chronicling her her progress. 

  • August 9

    I met Joanna Campe at the NOFA Conference 2008. I use Azomite in my garden along with my compost and have no need for fertilizers.
  • August 11

    After producing well over 100 cucumbers, they are still producing these. This picture is asparagus, carrots, gourd and onions. All of which are totally disease free and insect free and absolutely chemical free.

  • August 12

    I can’t really put into words how happy I am about the production of my garden. I recently decided that if the rock dust is that good at producing a garden like this why not try it on my front lawn, well in one day there was a difference - the lawn is lush and a beautiful green. I had some rhubarb that for three years produced a good crop and this year wasn’t doing so good…again, why not try Azomite? The very next day it showed signs of real health. I would like to thank Julie Rawson for suggesting I try remineralization, and I think my neighbors feel the same. 

  • August 14 

    This dill (photo 4) is from July, it was at least 7 ft tall and had some very interesting visitors. I think this is a Swallow tail caterpillar (photo 5.) The before and afters are amazing.

  • August 18

    Things are great especially in the garden. I’ve decided to become a member of RTE. I’m very excited about this. I listened to you, Dan and Don on your radio interview in North Carolina yesterday (press button in upper right-hand corner of RTE homepage to listen to the interview). I’m starting a community garden and was wondering if RTE has any advice on how to go about this.

    I tried an experiment with the minerals, I used a spreader to scatter some minerals in about a 5’ X 50’ area about 5 or 6 weeks ago. Yesterday I was taking down the hyper wing in my yard and all along the area that I put down the minerals were worm castings, pretty cool huh.

  • October 29

    I have found sources of free organic matter right here in Barre, MA. All of these free for the taking horse, cow, and chicken manure. I also have a source of free sawdust. So with each application of organic matter, I apply either summa or azomite. I’ve also expanded my garden. I now have 20 raised beds. This May I am going to have workshops in my yard with people from the University of Massachusetts (thanks to one of their students) and I will emphasize the importance on the use of rock dust. I also wanted to know if maybe you would need me to volunteer for something. Well, my garden this year was by far the best I’ve ever had and I know it’s only going to get better thanks to the amendments and to the wonderful volcanic ash and rock dust I have applied.

  • November 9

    We’ve already had 4 hard (killing) frosts and there is still plenty to be had in the garden. The rutabaga and carrots pictured here - parsnips, cabbage, celeriac, and a few stray potatoes. All of these veggies are fantastic after a hard frost.

     

Judy Roylance’s Testimonial
Fairmont, West Virginia
Once upon a time, on a farm not too far  away and not very long ago, there were five very old apple trees. Sadly,  they had no apples. They had not had any apples for many years; no one  knows how many. One tree was very tall; one was very wide; three were  dwarfs. The first dwarf tree stood next to a forsythia bush which was  too tired to put out any yellow flowers in April. The second dwarf tree  would have had a lovely shape if it had had anyone to prune the  suckering branches. The third dwarf tree stood near the hayfield and was  very unhappy indeed.

One winter day in late February an upright, two legged animal came  into the orchard with a ladder, some pruning shears and a wheelbarrow  full of granular, gray stuff with a label that said “Planters II, trace  mineral fertilizer. Over the next few days these five trees were  delighted to feel the wind and sun move more easily through their  branches. The suckers were removed as were the twisted branches, the  crossed branched and any that seriously impeded the sun and wind. Later  that spring some smelly, brown stuff that could have only come from the  back end of a cow was spread on the grass under these five trees.That  spring all the trees had flowers, some a few and some very many. In the  fall each tree had a few apples! There were not very many and they were  ill-shaped and spotted, but they were eagerly eaten by the deer and  that two legged animal. As the years passed the routine continued,  pruning, Planters II and cow manure, even on the forsythia. In time each  tree recovered, both its beautiful shape and its ability to provide  beautiful, tasty apples!

Judy Roylance’s Testimonial

Fairmont, West Virginia

Once upon a time, on a farm not too far away and not very long ago, there were five very old apple trees. Sadly, they had no apples. They had not had any apples for many years; no one knows how many. One tree was very tall; one was very wide; three were dwarfs. The first dwarf tree stood next to a forsythia bush which was too tired to put out any yellow flowers in April. The second dwarf tree would have had a lovely shape if it had had anyone to prune the suckering branches. The third dwarf tree stood near the hayfield and was very unhappy indeed.

One winter day in late February an upright, two legged animal came into the orchard with a ladder, some pruning shears and a wheelbarrow full of granular, gray stuff with a label that said “Planters II, trace mineral fertilizer. Over the next few days these five trees were delighted to feel the wind and sun move more easily through their branches. The suckers were removed as were the twisted branches, the crossed branched and any that seriously impeded the sun and wind. Later that spring some smelly, brown stuff that could have only come from the back end of a cow was spread on the grass under these five trees.

That spring all the trees had flowers, some a few and some very many. In the fall each tree had a few apples! There were not very many and they were ill-shaped and spotted, but they were eagerly eaten by the deer and that two legged animal. As the years passed the routine continued, pruning, Planters II and cow manure, even on the forsythia. In time each tree recovered, both its beautiful shape and its ability to provide beautiful, tasty apples!

Bill Neu’s Testimonial

Lyons, Wisconsin

Six years ago, 2001, I started gardening for the sake of improving my ailing health. I was determined to garden organically for the sake of food purity. Setting out with little knowledge and almost zero experience I had two very disappointing years of only fair yield and relentless insect attack.

Disillusioned, I then read up on some organic pest control approaches. Armed with a little non-toxic ammo I achieved less damaged produce. However it cost extra money and time and did not improve yield.

The non-toxic pest repelling was painful gain, but was soon to be a thing of the past; thanks in part to the example of an organic agricultural institute some miles drive away. I learned there was a way to bring beautiful organic produce to the table without the labor intensity I found inherent in my home brewed red pepper and garlic concoctions.

About that time I had come across online an eco-agriculture organization called Acres USA (www.acresusa.com). The information rapidly turned my mediocre gardening experience into an incredible joy. Within two years I had reduced insect pressure to nearly nothing and wonderfully increased yield, and of course the lack of bug induced markings made for eye appeal.

What I had learned from the Acres USA organization is that highly successful organic farmers claim that healthy plants do not invite insect attack. This was a foreign concept to me; I had never heard such a thing. I had assumed that if insects were around they needed something to eat and by nature were compelled to destroy my garden investment.

Implementing cover crop, good compost and using a natural approach to fertilization was the ticket to success. I now am a believer that healthy plants do not invite destructive insects.

For a fertilization program in addition to cover crop and compost I use a rock dust called AZOMITE. When the plants have good-sized foliage I also apply a seaweed based foliar spray. The results bring smiles and bounty.

The eco-minded experts say well fed soil life benefiting from the compost and the turned under cover crop break down inorganic minerals (rock fines) and make these nutrient sources available for absorption by the plant. As an added benefit of incorporating organic matter, the soil life - earthworms down to the microscopic bacteria - will produce a well aerated and porous soil structure that will greatly enhance air and water holding capacity and thus increase drought resistance and aid in preventing soil erosion.

It is worthy to note that plants that are healthy enough to escape insect attack are at the same time better for us because of the increased mineral content. And probably without exception the produce will be more pleasing to the palette.

Invest in a refractometer to see for yourself the produce quality that is found in the grocery produce aisle versus that of properly homegrown organic produce. The results are telling; you will no longer wonder why America is an increasingly ailing nation.

Dan Kittredge’s Testimonial

Spencer Brook Farm, Concord, MA

Tomatoes in full bloom and lush growth going through third flowering/fruiting cycle in MA. growing on soil that was last year not much more than low pH sand and gravel. A mix of rock powders was used to bring the plants to this state. Locally available granite schist, highly paramagnetic blacksand, high trace element spectrum summa minerals as well as high calcium lime and colloidal soft rock phosphate. None of the traditional fungus or wilt diseases struck or hornworms as can be easily seen by the lush growth and numerous fruiting cycles. Tomatoes grown on nearby soil were struck down by black wilt by mid August.

Welcome to the official Remineralize the Earth tumblr!

Remineralize the Earth is a nonprofit organization assisting the worldwide movement of remineralizing soils with finely ground rock dust, sea minerals and other natural and sustainable means to increase the growth, health, and nutrient value of all plant life. Adding minerals and trace elements is vital to the creation of fertile soils, healthy crops and forests, and is a key strategy to stabilize the climate.

Find out more at:


www.remineralize.org